JagdTiger 1/24scale / Bandai

Pytania, Technika / Technics, Questions, etc / Fragen, Techniken, etc

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happylappy
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JagdTiger 1/24scale / Bandai

Post autor: happylappy » 04 września 2013, 22:06

:flag_gb: Having already built Bandai’s 1/24 King Tiger, I’ve decided to convert my remaining 1/24 KT to a JagdTiger.

GUN MANTLET

Because these kits are so expensive & so hard to come-by I’ve started with what I think will be the most challenging part of the build – the gun mantlet. If I can’t get that right then I will have saved myself the pain of chopping up the kit for no good reason.

I spent a bit of time looking around for something suitable to base the mantlet on. I considered using different sized brass tubing, but that seemed to be very difficult to shape. I tried making a rough shape out of LEGO pieces which I would then mould and cast in resin, but the shape just didn’t seem right. Eventually I settled on using a 19mm garden hose coupling. It is roughly the correct shape & size, and easy to work with.

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Using the hose adapter as a base, i filled in the middle section with two-part Tamiya putty. The hose coupling has some nice ridges for screwing attachments on that work out quite well with ridges on the mantlet – so I used them to that effect. When the putty dried, I gently sanded to ensure it was evenly round.

Now because I don’t trust myself not to screw up, instead of just using the finished mantlet, I made a silicone mould of it using PinkySil, and cast a resin copy. To create the base of the mantlet I used a piece of Balsa cut to the rough shape

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I then covered the balsa with Mr.Surfacer 500 a couple of times, sanded to shape, inserted the resin copy of the “hose coupling” and voila! A JadTiger gun mantlet, complete with ridges and all. The shape isn’t quite correct, being a bit too tapered, but I thought it more important to have a nice even & round shape rather than exact accuracy. Most people wouldn’t notice anyway.


HULL SUPERSTRUCTURE

Next up is the hull superstructure. This was pretty simple. I blew up some scanned images of a JagdTiger to 1/25 scale, measured the size of the panels, and cut them to shape from a sheet of .60” styrene. It was just a matter of trial-and-error, and a bit of sanding to get all the panels to fit. On the inside of the joined panels I applied more Tamiya putty as the roof has bevelled edges, and shaping them might cut deeper than the styrene. It also adds some strength

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When the superstructure was finished, I sanded those bevelled roof edges to shape, and filled any gaps with Mr.Surfacer 1000.

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I created the gun mount in a similar manner to the mantlet. Using balsa, I cut the rough shape and glued it to the front of the superstructure using super glue. I followed this up with a good application of Tamiya 2-part putty. Before it dried, I ran a coin around the front of it to replicate the channel in the real thing.

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When the putty was dry, I sanded to shape, test fitted the mantlet, and finished by applying a couple of coats of Mr. Surfacer 500. To achieve the cast armour effect, I gently tease the Mr. Surfacer with a brush whilst it is drying.

To achieve the weld marks on the superstructure, I lay down two pieces of tape and apply liquid styrene cement down the middle of them. I leave it sit for about 5 mins then use a sharp tool or flat screwdriver to create the weld ridges & cuts in the soft styrene.

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SUPERSTRUCTURE ROOF

For detailing the top of the superstructure I have sourced parts from various places. The sliding vision port was cut out from a spare Academy Jagdpanther that I have. The forward right hatch & the ventilation cover are also pieces taken from the Academy kit. The drivers hatch is made from modifying the commanders cupola from the 1/25 Tamiya Tiger kit, as is the signal flare port. I’ve used the vision port covers from the Academy Jadgpanther, and I made the vision blocks themselves using clear casting resin in a mould I made.

All these parts are from my spares box, or the Academy Jagpanther which is being sacrificed for this build. It has quite a lot of parts that can be used to make theJagdTiger. I had already used the road wheels from it to replace the crappy ones on the Tamiya Jadpanther that I built previously, so it was a “spares” kit anyway. It’s an expensive way to obtain spares & seems a bit of a waste for a whole kit, but there you go.

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Ostatnio zmieniony 02 listopada 2014, 10:30 przez happylappy, łącznie zmieniany 2 razy.

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Post autor: PITERPANZER » 04 września 2013, 22:42

Looks good, we wait for the progress.
You can support using the paper-card models by GPM.
Some examples of ready models or/and built reports You find in our forum.
Good luck.
P.S. Do You plane to use original tracks or You change to new one by Vs?
Zapraszam do sklepu/Welcome to the shop !
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Tommy T.B.
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Post autor: Tommy T.B. » 05 września 2013, 19:13

Welcome :Default:

Model looks very good :okok:
I also have this model of King Tiger II Porsche and I had the same idea, but for now it threw.
You have a problem with the length of the vehicle tank. Jagdtiger was extended by 260 mm hull than the King Tiger. Calculated to 1:24 scale is about 10.83mm.
Look at the drawings below. You have marked differences in the length of the hull.
You have any plans, to resolve this problem?

I wish You good luck in further construction :Default: :okok:
Regards
Tommy
Załączniki
King Tiger Ausf. B.JPG
Jagdtiger Ausf. B.JPG

happylappy
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Post autor: happylappy » 05 września 2013, 21:08

G'day Piotr & Tommy,

Thanks for the encouragement. I'm not going to use the tracks from the VS Tank kit as I am trying to keep my costs down. I know the kit supplied tracks aren't great but they will have to do.

Regards the 280mm hull extension, I am just pretending that its not there! I'm not exactly sure where the extension is, but it's certainly not on the rear engine deck. I decided that it would be just too hard (it's one of a few things that will be an accuracy error in the build). I'm just hoping that the finished tank will look a lot like a JagdTiger. Most people probably won't notice anyway.

Happy modelling

Danny.

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Post autor: PITERPANZER » 05 września 2013, 22:12

I could write the same, but Tommy is faster then me. The hull was longer behind the last arm.
Lots of plastic models have got the same mistake and looks good.
If somebody is not a armor fun never will see the small difference, but we will ;)
O`k for us it`s top secret since now :glasses:
Ostatnio zmieniony 04 października 2013, 12:45 przez PITERPANZER, łącznie zmieniany 1 raz.
Zapraszam do sklepu/Welcome to the shop !
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Post autor: happylappy » 03 października 2013, 20:26

HULL ROOF

Using a drill bit in a pin vice, I hollowed out a series of holes in the superstructure roof. I added a small amount of super-glue with a toothpick, and then dropped in some 0.9mm hex-bolts from Lion Roar.

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HULL ACCESS HATCH

To create the doors for the crew access, I simply sketched out the shapes on some .060” styrene. I added the various holes using a drill bit in a pin vice, and repeated the process to create the hinges.

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GLACIS AND FORWARD HULL

I cast several vision blocks in clear resin. Once set, I painted the outsides Testors gunmetal and glued them in place. Using a Dremel, I removed the top of the Glacis plate in-front of the right-hand side vision block, to match a final-production vehicle. Still with the Dremel, I removed the headlight-wiring & rosette. The air ventilator was placed on the right-hand side, and then the vision-block covers glued in place.

Next I attached the bow MG port, and when it was set, ran liquid cement around the edge and poked it with a small screwdriver to re-create the weld-bead. I created the fender attachments the same way as I did for the rear hull. I drew in pencil where the gun travel lock will be fitted, but I will get to the travel lock itself later.

I added two grab-handles from the JagdP kit & a key lock to each access hatch. I dropped (not glued) the centre section into the upper hull, added the stops, lifting hooks (from JadgP) and finished the whole thing with a light stippled-coat of Mr Surfacer 1000.

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REAR HULL

I removed all the kit details from the upper portion of the rear hull. I drilled 8 holes for the towing-clevis racks, and inserted 2 different diameters of brass rod in-place, using super glue to re-create the weld beads. The formation-light on the lower left is the ABER tool-holders late part with some styrene rod. For the jack-block storage I used some L-shaped styrene & shaped the strap using thin brass strip. To re-create the fender attatchments, I glued 0 .2mm styrene strip and .030 styrene rod in three sections on each side.

To create the towing block, I used balsa wood to create the shape, and then sealed with several coats of Mr-Surfacer 500. I removed the bolts off the inside of the exhaust supports, and then glued the towing block in-place. I added small styrene lifting points to each side of the exhaust supports, and added that small ring (I have no idea what it is) to the right exhaust, made from styrene tube.

Finally I stippled on some Mr. Surfacer 1000, and added the towing lock to the towing block. Because balsa does not drill well, I cut the lock into 3 sections and then glued it on, to make it look like it is inserted through the block.

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When all complete, I glued the rear hull in place, and then the superstructure on top. From my experience of building this kit before, I know that the upper-rear hull does not fit well with the engine deck – it has a bow in it that runs along the back where the two meet. To avoid this I glued the top of the rear hull flush with the engine deck and just accepted where the rest of the rear hull fit. That meant there were some gaps between the hull sides and the rear hull. I filled these in with 2-part epoxy. I added more epoxy to re-create the heavy weld seams.

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Ostatnio zmieniony 02 listopada 2014, 10:35 przez happylappy, łącznie zmieniany 1 raz.

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Post autor: PITERPANZER » 05 października 2013, 19:36

Looks good.
Do You know paper-card jagdtiger model by GPM ?
There You have all parts in 2D and it`s easier to do 3D for You.
Lets try paper-card modelling and connect it with plastic or resin models.
Zapraszam do sklepu/Welcome to the shop !
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Post autor: happylappy » 01 grudnia 2013, 22:04

ENGINE DECK & SUPERSTRUCTURE ROOF

Firstly, the details for the fuel/water fillers at the rear of the engine deck are incorrect. I cut them off an old Panther-G that I had built (Academy) and glued them in place of the kit’s parts. For the air ventilator cover I modified a piece from the Jagdpanther kit, drilling out small holes around the edge and placing lion-roar bolts in them. For the photo-etch grille screens I used the GPM Jadtiger set. The round pieces are just a tiny bit too-small, but acceptable. To round them out, I lifted the two external rings from the ABER Panther-G set, and placed them on top of the GPM pieces. The rectangular grilles are unfortunately too small – the width is correct but the length too short. To get around this I had to use 2-sets. I cut each into two pieces and then fitted one to each end of the grille. Not a cheap way to do it, but I couldn’t think of any other way around it.

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Once the photo-etch screens were in-place, I gently pushed them into the grille voids with the end of a wooden paintbrush to create a worn look. Soldiers walked all over the rear decks of tanks, shrapnel landed on them and fuel drums were dropped all the time. I think it’s important for the grilles to look a little “bent out of shape” to help the models realism. Using a sharp knife I cut a couple of holes in the rear two grilles, and then gently bent around the holes. I added the fire-extinguisher mount from the ABER tools set, and fashioned the extinguisher from some brass rod. I added the storage tube under the access hatch using hollow brass rod and some brass strips. Finally I added the fuel-drains using some thin wire and some spare bolts

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To add detail to the superstructure roof, I used the following:-
- Forward vision block & binoculars: various parts from the Academy JagdPanther kit, including the hinge & the vision block cover. I use a pin vice to drill out the holes around the edge & inserted lion-roar bolts
- Sliding vision port straight from the Academy JagdPanther kit, adding a piece of styrene on one end to the complete the mounts
- Aerial base using the GPM photo-etch part and the mount from the Academy JagdPanther
- Commanders cupola; cut from the Tamiya Tiger I kit, with sheet styrene added in the middle. Hatch made from styrene with a hinge from the Academy JagdPanther and a handle made from brass stip. Again I drilled around the edge of the cupola and added bolts
- Ventilator cover from the Academy Jagdpanther
- Rotating vision port; base is a modified piece from the Academy Jadpanther; vision port a modified piece from the Jagdpanther
- Close-in defense port taken from the roof of the Academy Panther-G
- Vision port covers & lifting rings from Academy Jagdpanther; vision port home-made clear resin pieces ( I have made my own mould for these which comes in very handy)
- Pilz made from styrene rod

And there you have it. A JadTiger roof.

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TRAVEL-LOCK & OVM

To create the gun travel-lock, i used my blown up 1:25 plans, and just placed styrene rod & strip over the top of the drawing until I had the right shape. I had to heat a piece of styrene & gently bend it to get the curved shape. For the mounts, I cut off the ends from two D-shackles and glued them on to the end of the styrene, using a little epoxy putty to blend them in. I placed the finished travel lock on the glacis plate, and traced around the edges with a pencil. I used the outline to glue on the mounting blocks at the bottom. They are not quite the right shape, but close enough. At this stage i did not attach the travel lock, as it would be a pain for painting.

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I won’t describe every piece of the OVM, just have a look at the pictures. I used the ABER tool set where possible, and formed the rest of the mounts & clamps out of styrene & brass strip. You will notice that I have filled in all the holes in the kit with epoxy, & removed all the raised mounting tabs. To identify the location of each piece of equipment, I measured straight from my 1:25 plans and drew the location on the hull in pencil. You will also notice the long solid pencil line that indicated where the side-skirts would be if they were fitted. This helps create a good reference point.

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Post autor: PITERPANZER » 02 grudnia 2013, 01:03

You `re incredible .
I `ve seen only one another jagdtiger based on KT from Bandai.
It was in Fine Scele Magazine many tears ago. maybe i try to find this article.
Do You plane tracks from the boc or buy new one from 1-24 RC KT ?
I hear they have metal tracks too.
Zapraszam do sklepu/Welcome to the shop !
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happylappy
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Post autor: happylappy » 05 grudnia 2013, 01:31

Hello Piotr,

Thank you for your kind words. More than anything though I think that I am patient. Taking your time equals a good build[img]http://image_url[/img]

Regards the tracks, I am a little ahead of my last post and I have already done them. I have covered them with so much dirt, mud and foliage that accuracy errors should be hidden:

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I did not know that there were metal tracks available? I have looked and looked but never found any metal tracks for the Tiger I / II and the Panthers. Maybe they are available in Europe but not here in Australia??

My concern with using different tracks, is that they might not fit the drive sprockets. I know for example that the Academy Panther tracks don't fit the sprocket on the Tamiya Panther and vice-versa.

I will hopefully upload some more progress soon. Happy modelling.

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Post autor: PITERPANZER » 05 grudnia 2013, 09:53

I have to explain You the problem with panther`s tracks. Even the tracks from early Academy Panther A don`t fit to late academy Panther G.
Why? The different teeth on drive sprocket.
Academy corrected it on late panther.
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Post autor: happylappy » 06 grudnia 2013, 01:35

FINAL CONSTRUCTION & ROAD WHEELS

Finishing up, I added the headlight and wiring to the glacis. I used the headlight from the Academy Panther-G set with a small piece of styrene strip, and styrene rod, carefully bent, for the wiring. Different models of the JagdTiger had different wiring locations & this one represents a final production model.

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Moving on to the superstructure sidewalls, I added spare track-link supports. Using a sharp knife I cut strips in a thick piece of lead sheet for the brackets, measuring each one & bending into shape. Using my schematics, I drew the locations of all the pieces on the hull in pencil to make sure everything lined up. After gluing on all the lead brackets with super-glue I used square styrene strips to replicate the pin-supports, and glued in place with normal styrene glue. I added the small handles from the GPM JagdTiger kit around the edges of the roof & added pilz made from hollowed out styrene rod.

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So that should be pretty much it for primary construction. I stippled on some Mr. Surfacer 1000 and moved on to the road wheels. This is a step completely unnecessary for this build, but I created resin road wheels. My reasoning for this is that I want to be able to build a Tiger I late, Panther G late & a Panther F in the future – and they all need steel-rimmed road wheels much like the ones in the Bandai kit. I figure that you only need the first two road-wheels on each side for alignment and then you can use resin ones for the rest.


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This took a long time. I made a 2-piece silicone mould and cast my resin wheels one at a time. I started out using some old quick setting epoxy resin that was lying around, and when that ran out I moved on to a tin of clear fibre-glass repair resin that I coloured using grey pigment. There were a lot of casts that did not work properly. I probably ended up making twice as many road wheels than required to get enough that were OK. But in the end I had enough. Some had small imperfections that I repaired and some I just ignored. They’re all going to be covered in mud & dirt anyway and It will be hard to see the little errors

UH-OH
So the time came to paint all those resin pieces that I made, which included the gun mantlet that I did right back at the very beginning. And it was now that I discovered that the old bottle of quick setting epoxy had gone off. The epoxy didn’t set properly and oozed resin on the surface – even though I had poured the mantlet months ago. Clearly it hadn’t cured properly and was never going to. The problem this creates is that paint will not stick to the surface. The oozing resin stops it from bonding and you can just wipe it off. This would be OK for the road-wheels as I was going to cover them with mud, but was not going to work with the gun mantlet. So I went back to square one, and made a mantlet all over again. I use the garden hose fitting that I created the original mould off and shaped the base from another piece of balsa. Since I was spending the time having to do this all over again, I corrected the shape and fattened it up using some tamiya 2-part epoxy.

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I was pretty annoyed at having to spend time doing all of this again, but in the end the new mantlet is a much better shape than the original one. So maybe it was a blessing in disguise. All finished, I fixed it in place using Tamiya 2-part epoxy. When set it is quite strong and it gives you plenty of time to adjust the piece and get the alignment correct.

happylappy
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Post autor: happylappy » 05 stycznia 2014, 09:55

PAINTING

Painting is a fairly straight forward process. For the Dunkelgelb I mixed 5 parts Humbrol 121 with 7 parts Humbrol 94. The Olivgrun is Testors Olivgrun ’43 & the schokoladebraun Testors Schokoladebraun ’43 with just a dash of Testors Panzer interior buff.

I painted the whole JagdT in the Dunkelgelb mix. When dry I airbrushed on the Olivgrun pattern. Finally I hand painted the brown circles. All of this serves as a base for the next step – Zenithal lighting effects.

Put in simple turms the zenithal effect is where you alter the shade of the colours to look as though the object is being lit from straight overhead. Horizontal surfaces are lightest, vertical surfaces darkest. I normally use about 4 “zones” for the effect.

I airbrush the sides first, working from darkest to lightest (bottom to top) starting with the Dunkelgelb. In order they are:

1. The original Dunkelgelb mix darkened with black OR burnt umber (bottom of surface)
2. The Base coat left untouched
3. The original Dunkelgelb mix lightened with Humbrol Matt Stone 121
4. The Original Dunkelgelb mix significantly lightened with Humbrol Matt Stone 121 (top of surface)

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I repeat the process with Olivgrun, using matt black to darken instead of burnt umber.

For the horizontal surfaces:

1. Paint from the centre of panels towards the edges with significanyly lightened mix
2. Paint the centre of the panels with a light mix that almost looks washed out.

Be careful on horizontal surfaces. The green should not be lightened as much as the yellow.

So now we have a JadT that looks like it has a bit more depth. The next step is to make that paintwork look a bit more “used”. It is important to note that this step is not really weathering. Its just scratching the paintwork.

To achieve that worn look I paint little “islands” and irregular patterns on areas that I think would be worn. I use buff oil paint to apply the little patches here and there. I don’t just jab the paintbrush on the surface, but actually paint the little areas. It is difficult to make them all look different & this step takes a looooooooong time. But the end results will be worth it.


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When the oil paint is dry (I give it a minimum 3 days) I use a dark grey enamel paint, and fill in most of the islands & scratches. I leave a little of the buff oil paint still exposed – this helps to make it look like the paint is being worn back.

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For areas around crew hatches, grab rails etc I use a slightly different technique. Although I still paint on some “islands” I also use a small sponge dauber to apply the oil paint in human-wear areas. Make sure that you wipe most of the oil paint of the dauber before you press it on to the surface, otherwise it just blots everything out. Repeat with the grey enamel.

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Post autor: happylappy » 10 stycznia 2014, 12:31

AND NOW FOR THE ART!

To me, the weathering is what makes or breaks the final product- good weathering can cover up bad construction, but bad weathering can ruin excellent construction. To me this is art! I don’t have an absolute method of application, rather I just keep working until it looks right. And this is the end-game:

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A panel that looks alive. It has subtle rain & rust streaks, some rusty stained areas, some rust bubbling under the paintwork & some good old fashioned dirty spots. Here is roughly the process I use.

STEP 1. FILTERS

I mix oil paints with white spirit in about a 5-95 ratio. Using a soft brush I flood the almost opaque filters onto the surface. I generally don’t use too many colours. I find that ochre brings out a nice warm tone in the yellows, as can burnt-umber. Buff can help to wash-out sun bleached panels. Occasionally I might use a little emerald-green to deepen the Olivgrun. Try and keep the warm tones around the edges & the washed out tones to horizontal surfaces & panel centres. Apply several filters after each has dried to help vary the surfaces.


STEP 2. SHADING

I use oil paints to help give the subject depth - you want that little tank of yours to look like a big 3D object not just a small plastic replica. I start with the dark areas first. I use a small stiff brush with black oil paint. I rub the oil paint gently into recesses & other dark areas that wouldn’t see much light (such as under the mantlet), building them up slowly. It’s a little bit like dry brushing – you don’t want to “paint” the black on rather you want to work it in. I slowly work outwards from the darkest areas, rubbing in less paint as I move outwards & blending each lighter area to the next. Don’t go too far - look at reference photos and see where the shadows are and how far they extend. Around hatches & some panel edges I might apply a very light rubbing of black, or sometimes burnt-umber, to help give them more depth.

For horizontal surfaces I rub buff paint in using a similar method - just in reverse. Start at the middle of panels and work out towards the edges, using less as you move further out. If you really want to distress the surface you can use white – but I can only say don’t use too much as it really washes colours out. The paint doesn’t have to be evenly applied. Little blotches and areas of differing application help to break-up large surfaces. For non-horizontal surfaces you can use a little buff oil paint at the tops of panels to help wash them out, but avoid using buff at the bottom of a surface (ie sloping side armour) where they would normally be darker.

A word about this method – take your time as the effect changes as the paint dries over a few days. Do a little bit first and see how it turns out before you attack the whole tank!

STEP 3. RUST, RAIN & STREAKS

I create rust spots and streaks in a three stage method


1. Using a 5-95 mix of buff oils, I flood around the little grey enamel “islands” that I painted earlier. Then I place a very small amount of straight buff oil paint in the “island” areas, and using a brush dampened with white-spirit, draw the paint downwards. This creates a nice rain streak effect.

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2. I variously use rust-coloured oils (like burnt umber, sienna & light red) and apply them in a similar fashion to the “islands”, making sure though to use less than I did with the buff. You want more rain streaks and less rust.


3. Finally I just apply little dabs of the rust coloured oils in individual spots to mark fresh rust and scratches, wherever I think they might be, and gently pull them down with a moist brush to create the rust streaks.

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Remember it is always easy to remove oil paints if you make a mistake. Just use a soft brush moist with white-spirits.

For the horizontal surfaces I don’t streak anything as nothing “runs off” a flat surface. I just flood around the “islands” and dab some rust colours in particular spots. For oil & fuel stains I apply several blotches of 5-95 mix black & burnt umber around fuel fillers etc. So there you have it! Doesn’t sound like a lot, but to be done properly it takes a long time.

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Post autor: happylappy » 01 lutego 2014, 01:51

ROADWHEELS, TRACKS, MUD & FOLIAGE

Before I fit the roadwheels & tracks, I completely cover the hull in the areas behind the wheels and under the hull with a dirt mix. This is the same method I use to dirty the tracks and the roadwheels, so read on to find out how.

The JT had steel rimmed road wheels which were polished smooth by the tracks & their teeth. To simulate this I painted the outside surfaces of the roadwheels with Testors Dark Anodic Grey Metalizer & polished them before I fit the roadwheels to the model. This is a step not required for rubber rimmed wheels.

Next I fit the previously painted roadwheels, and secure the tracks over them. For the tracks I spray them Testors Burnt Umber, and once they’re dry give them a very light airbrush coat of Testors Anthractic Grey. The Grey is a metallic colour that helps tracks look like metal, not Bandai or Tamiya vinyl.

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To make the tracks dirty, I apply Mr. HOBBY Clear Flat Base (H30) in small sections to the tracks. Any flat base will work, as long as it is not one of those which leaves a white residue when dry (for example the Tamiya acrylic flat base). Whilst the painted-on flat base is still wet, I use a medium size brush with soft bristles to pick up pastel powder (pigments) and dab them onto the surface. You can use any dirt coloured pastels you like – for this build I ground up a stick of artists’ pastel warm grey. On my last build (the King Tiger) I used more ochre based colours. The brush will rapidly get messy, with clumps of pastel & flat base sticking to it, but that is OK.

Straight away I create a mix of my chosen pastel colour with some Model-Train scenic road base (light grey in colour), small Talus & some random small pieces of moss, scenic-leaves & any other small organic matter that might get picked up by a track. I dip a large stiff brush in the flat–base, then dip it in the organic pieces mix, covering the bristles and then apply it to the tracks. As it is drying I might sprinkle some more pigment powder on the top & add individual pieces of leaves and moss to the flat base. Varying the pigment colours helps give the dirt a little bit of variety. When the applied mix & pastels are drying, I use a pipette to drop on Woodland-Scenics spray-on scenic cement. This helps to hold it all in place when dry.

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For the roadwheels I use just use the first step of applying the flat-base acrylic, and then dab my chosen pastels colours on them. I don’t add the organic material step to the wheels. If I want to create grease stains & leaks, I wait to all the dirt is dry, and apply light runs of thinned black-oil paint solution, much like with the filters to the hull.

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For the polished steel surface on the roadwheels, I carefully apply silver paint around the edges of the outside rims. I also very gently dry-brushed the silver paint onto the track teeth, and some areas of the outside track faces and tread. This helps the tracks to maintain a metallic look.

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Again, for the hull I use the same process – I apply the acrylic flat base to where I think mud would be spattered, and then apply pastel powders to the spot. If you want to build up a layer of mud you can mix in some road-base & talus with the pigment and apply that in successive layers. It all depends on how dirty you want the tank to be. By using this method in layers, using different shades of pastels you can achieve the look of mud built up over a period of time. Also adding filters of thinned oil paints can help to vary the layers of dirt & dried mud. I variously use shades of Umber, Sienna & sometimes even Buff oil paints. The process of creating a field dirty look isn’t an exact one. I just keep applying the dirt until I think it looks right.

Finally I add some leaf litter to the tank to help give it a more realistic look. I use commercially available scale leaves – I prefer the natural products from Joe-Fix & Treemendus. I loosely scatter the leaves over the hull and very gently blow over them. This helps the leaves settle into the locations that natural airflow would put them. Then I carefully secure them by applying Woodland-Scenics spray on scenic cement with a paint brush. Gently press a brush wet with the glue to the surface around the leaf, or the leaf itself, & the glue flows off the brush & sets the leaf in place. The glue dries to a clear matt.

TA-DA!

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